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9 Unique Facts About Penguins

Penguins are among some of the most beloved animals in the world. As much as people love them, many penguin species are listed as endangered animals.

At Fahlo, saving penguins is important to us. Beyond our partnership with the Global Penguin Society, we think education is a significant part of conservation. The more people know about these wonderful birds, the more they will want to protect them.

In the interest of teaching people about our favorite flightless birds, we have gathered a few unique facts about penguins.

Some Can Get Large

The emperor penguin is the biggest penguin species. On average, these penguins grow to about 45 inches. Some can even grow taller than 50 inches. Beyond their impressive height, emperor penguins can range in weight from about 50 to 100 lbs. 

Some are Quite Small

There is a lot of diversity in the variety of penguin species. On one end, you have the large emperor penguin; on the other, you have the little blue penguin. The average little blue penguin is about 13 inches tall. They also weigh around 3-3.5 pounds.

The Perfect Camouflage 

People often note the way a penguin’s coloring gives the appearance of formalwear. While it may look like a tuxedo to us, the coloring is also the perfect camouflage for the life of a penguin. The black back makes them hard to spot from above against the dark ocean. From below, their white fronts are hard to spot against the brightness of the sky.

Rocks and Courtship

Many breeds of penguins use rocks to build their nests. Some will even travel great distances to acquire the right rocks. The pebbles can also play a role in the courting process for some penguins. Male Adelie penguins are known to offer rocks to females as a part of the courting process.

Excellent Swimmers

Penguins might not be able to fly, but they are excellent swimmers. Emperor penguins are capable of impressive feats in the water. An emperor penguin can dive to depths of more than 1,500 feet. They can also hold their breath for more than 20 minutes.

No Penguin Teeth

Penguins might eat fish, but they do not have teeth. The penguin mouth is comprised of their pointed beak, which they use to grab food. Instead of teeth, the roof of the mouth and tongue are lined with spikes that angle back toward the throat. These spikes help them keep food in their mouths.

Penguin Monogamy 

Most penguin species practice monogamy during mating season. However, there are a few species, like gentoos and Magellanic penguins, that pair off for life. Couples use distinct calls to help find each other when in large groups of penguins.

The Flashy Dresser

The macaroni penguin got its name from an 18th Century term for a man who was an excessively ornate dresser. With the distinctive yellow plumes, the penguins look like they are dressed to impress. The first explorers to find them took note of this and named them macaroni penguins.

The Speedster 

With their slick coats and flippers, penguins can swim fast. Of all penguin species, the gentoo is the fastest in the water. These penguins have been observed swimming at speeds of up to 22 miles per hour. 

Whether emperor penguin, gentoo or little blue penguin, these birds live fascinating lives. With our penguin bracelets, you can do more to help save these birds. With each sale, we donate a portion of the profits to the Global Penguin Society. You also get a real penguin you can learn about and track throughout its life.